Sunday, November 4, 2012

How Qaddafi Fooled Libya and the World - Max Fisher - The Atlantic

 Though he sold himself as either a costumed buffoon, a wild-eyed terrorist, or a wary reformer, Qaddafi's rule from his unlikely rise to his inevitable fall was one of the most cunning and improbable feats of modern dictatorships

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Qaddafi speaks to the summit meeting of the nonaligned nations in Sri Lanka, 

August 1976 / AP

In the first few months of 1969, Libya was so filled with rumors that the country's senior military leadership would oust the king in a bloodless coup that, when the coup actually happened on September 1, nobody bothered to check who had led it. A handful of military vehicles had rolled up to government offices and communication centers, quietly shutting down the monarchy in what was widely seen as a necessary and overdue transition. King Idris's government had become so incapable and despised that neither his own personal guard nor the massive U.S. military force then stationed outside Tripoli intervened. Army units around the country, believing that the coup was an implicit order from the military chiefs, quickly secured local government offices. Not a single death was reported; all of Libya, it seemed, had welcomed the military revolution.

FOR THE FULL ARTICLE CLICK HERE: How Qaddafi Fooled Libya and the World - Max Fisher - The Atlantic

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